Ethnic Jewels Magazine

Ethnic Jewels Magazine is a celebration of personal adornment in all of it’s wonderful forms. We study the ways in which people adorn themselves and express themselves though jewellery, tattooing, textiles and body modification. Drawing from historical, contemporary and diverse geographical sources we bring together great articles which explore the human desire to adorn, taking care to consider the cultural and environmental influences upon those forms of adornment.. Ethnic Jewels Magazine features writers who are experts in their field, and brings accurate and well researched content to you in a free online publication. Inside Ethnic Jewels Magazine you will find regular articles by experts, book reviews, ethnic jewellery buying guides, and historical insights in to the people who wear these wonderful creations. Ethnic Jewels Magazine provides focus on specialist areas, such as hair adornment, contemporary designers, and exhibitions. Ethnic Jewels Magazine is the first free online magazine which is focussed wholly on adornment, and continues to grow as a wonderful resource for those with an interest or passion for the beauty and diversity of human adornment. Join our mailing list to stay informed of our recent work on the Ethnic Jewels Magazine website and also the Ethnic Jewels Network which brings together the very best of Ethnic Jewels online content.

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Article

Yaroslava Kellermann – Designer

Yaroslava Kellermann – Designer

About myself My brother and I were raised in a family of teachers. Except of math and history, both of my parents studied music, so we were surrounded by it and by books. The last years of the Soviet Union and the first of Ukrainian independence were extremelly harsh, but I remember that my mom…

Hair adorned

Of Combs and Saints by Barbara Steinberg

Of Combs and Saints by Barbara Steinberg

It was a time before nations. Celtic tribes ruled Gaul until they were conquered by the Roman Empire (121 – 51 BC). In the early 5th Century, Roman Gaul was overwhelmed by the Visigoths, Burgundians, and Franks until 481, when Frankish King Childeric I defeated the Visigoths, and his son King Clovis I united all…

Contemporary

Stefania Lucchetta

Stefania Lucchetta

Stefania Lucchetta was born and lives in Bassano del Grappa (Vicenza area), Italy. She holds degrees from Ca’ Foscari University in Venice (1999, BA with honors in Literature and Art History) and Scuola Italiana Design of Padua (2004, Master degree in Industrial Design), besides some modules previously taken at the Venice College of Fine Arts….

Ethnic Jewels magazine, bringing together a vast knowledge base of all things jewellery and adornment related.

A free online publication with articles discussing and highlighting all topics related to ethnic jewellery and adornment . Historical and geographical information related to personal adornment and insightful, informative pieces explaining the significance of adornment to those who wear it.

The ever growing ethnic jewels community has over 16000 jewellery images to study and discuss with a large membership, and ongoing daily jewellery related discussions. Membership of the community is free, and each member has a fully customisable page.

With news, reviews and topical articles, Ethnic Jewels Magazine is the best source of information online for those with a passion for adornment.

The magazine

The Global City – A book launch at the Mayfair Gallery of Michael Backman. Review and comment by Sarah Corbett.

The Global City – A book launch at the Mayfair Gallery of Michael Backman. Review and comment by Sarah Corbett.

by Annemarie Jordan Gschwend  (Editor), K.J.P. Lowe (Editor) Publisher: Paul Holberton Publishing (December 19, 2015) ISBN-13: 978-1907372889 A bridge between the world of the historian and the world of the collector. A concept which seems obvious, a concept which requires ‘two way traffic’. As one whose awarenesses are deeply rooted within the realm of collectors and gatherers, I frequently dip into…

Book review – Ethnic Jewellery and Adornment – by Truus Daalder

Book review – Ethnic Jewellery and Adornment – by Truus Daalder

Ethnic Jewellery and Adornment – by Truus Daalder Author: Truus Daalder  Photographs: Jeremy Daalder Editor: Joost Daalder ISBN: 978-1-921394-28-7  Published by Ethnic Art Press, Adelaide, 2009  and Macmillan, Melbourne, 2009 This impressive book records an eclectic collection of items used for adornment from Australia, Oceania, Asia and Africa. The book features 700 items, the majority of…

Guedra by Sarah Corbett

Guedra by Sarah Corbett

The word Guedra represents several aspects of a form of dance which is particular to Southern Morocco, Mauritania and Algeria. The primary meaning is cooking pot, when this pot is covered with a stretched leather skin to create a drum, the drum is also known as Guedra. When the drummer plays a beat representing a…

Bound Earth by Andrea Williams

Bound Earth by Andrea Williams

  Andrea Williams is an independent fine art jewelry designer living in New England. She is an accomplished metalsmith who specializes in contemporary, eco-conscious, nature inspired jewelry. Andrea created Bound Earth out of her belief that jewelry should not be worn as a status symbol, but should instead bring us closer to the earth that…

#Jezwecan and the adornment of Unity- by Sarah Corbett

#Jezwecan and the adornment of Unity- by Sarah Corbett

Jewellery has been used as a tool of communication throughout history. Jewellery has the ability to convey a message to others. During certain points in history jewellery became a clear and definite statement of a political movement. In the Uk in 1903 Emmeline Pankhurst founded the Women’s Social and Political Union, she developed a new…

Jill Hermans

Jill Hermans

Based in Melbourne, Jill is interested in the ways desire has inspired humans, driven them to create and motivated them to adorn. Having completed a Bachelor of Fine Arts (Metals and Jewellery) at Monash University, she examines how the quality of colour and sensation of tactility dictates our desire and attraction in relation to jewellery….

Heart of Darkness, the Congo –  by Barbara Steinberg

Heart of Darkness, the Congo – by Barbara Steinberg

  The Luba Empire was a pre-colonial Central African state, which was founded by King Kongolo Maniema, c. 1585. The Hemba people were incorporated because they started to migrate into Luba territory at the beginning of the Empire. In addition to being artistically influenced by the Luba, the Hemba endured kidnappings by Arab raiders for…

Facial Tattooing of Berber Women – by Sarah Corbett

Facial Tattooing of Berber Women – by Sarah Corbett

Tattoos in a tribal context are as much a communicator as they are a means of Adornment. They can be understood in the capacity of an expression of self, a sign of religious belonging, or relieve symptoms of spiritual or physical ills. In all cases Tattoos serve as a means of portraying ones identity. Within…

Yoruba Textile –  Lightning Strike by Duncan Clarke

Yoruba Textile – Lightning Strike by Duncan Clarke

Why might a rich Yoruba lady living in southern Nigeria over a century ago choose to have zigzags embroidered on her expensive wrapper cloth? This is a unique piece with no similar examples known and no ethnographic context to explain it, so we can only speculate based on our knowledge of Nigerian textile history and…

Whang Od –  Last Batok artist of Kalinga.

Whang Od – Last Batok artist of Kalinga.

In a small village called Buscalan in Kalinga, The Philippines A woman called Whang Od is possibly the last of her kind. At a sprightly 97 years of age she is keeping alive the traditions of her ancestors, the tradition is called “Batok” and is the art of tattooing. Tattooing has been practised in the…

Puabi: Queen of Ur

Puabi: Queen of Ur

During the first dynasty of Ur (Ca 2600 BCE) a women priestess or queen lived. Ur was an important Sumerian city-state, which is located in Mesopotamia which is present day Iraq. Puabi is sometimes called Shubad, however this translation from the Akkadiam language was later found to be incorrect. Her tomb was discovered by Leonard…

Pafta Belts of the Balkans. By Gratiela Buzic.

Pafta Belts of the Balkans. By Gratiela Buzic.

  Belts and buckles : who wore them and why? Belts with metal buckles have been very popular items in the female dress style in the Balkans sincethe XVIII th century and their popularity was believed to came as Ottoman influence in the area. Even the word used to name the metal buckles comes from…

News

The Staffordshire Hoard

BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND—Fragments of artifacts from the Staffordshire Hoard have been cleaned and are being fitted together in work funded by Historic England and public donations. The seventh-century Anglo-Saxon artifacts include a rare high-status helmet and a unique form of sword pommel that was in 26 pieces when it was uncovered. The pommel “combines multiple different…

Japanese mirrors

FUKUOKA PREFECTURE, JAPAN—A fragment of a mold used to cast bronze mirrors in 200 B.C. has been unearthed at the Sugu Takauta ruins in northern Kyushu. It had been thought that such tachukyo, or mirrors with knobs, had been imported from the Korean Peninsula at this time. The mold shows indentations to create knobs on…

A farmer in southeastern Poland unearthed three gold bracelets

KROSNO, POLAND—A farmer in southeastern Poland unearthed three gold bracelets tied with golden wire that are thought to date to between 1600 and 400 B.C. “We will study the place of discovery because we want to determine whether it was a discovery of a treasure, or perhaps remains of a burial ground,” Jan Gancarski, director…

Royals and Regalia: Inside the Palaces of Nigeria’s Monarchs

The Newark Museum presents; “Royals and Regalia: Inside the Palaces of Nigeria’s Monarchs,” a collection of photographs from George Osodi’s project, George has visited the palaces of over 20 kings and queens all over Nigeria. The project is intended to show off Nigeria’s history and cultural complexity, and to promote harmony in a country often torn apart by ethnic and…

‘Kimono: A Modern History’ at the Met Tells Rich Stories Through Fabric

When clothing appears at the Metropolitan Museum, it’s typically a big to-do involving the Costume Institute, haute couture and numerous theatrical set pieces. (See, for instance, the current exhibition of Victorian mourning attire.) But “Kimono: A Modern History,” quietly folded into the museum’s Arts of Japan Galleries, is a different kind of fashion show. It’s…